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  paramotor FAQs

paramotor FAQs

  what is a paramotor?
  what is a powerchute?
  do I need a pilot's licence?
  how does the chute inflate?x
  can I launch it myself?
  what is the maximum wind I can fly in?
  how do I steer it?
  how long can I fly on a tank?
  how fast does it fly?
  what happens when the engine stops?

  is it safe?
  is it exciting?
  is it affordable?
  is it easy to learn?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

what is a paramotor?

 

  what is a paramotor?

A Paramotor is a motorized paraglider.
It is not an airplane and does not fly like one. The motor fits on the back of the pilot.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

what is a powerchute?

 

 

  what is a powerchute?

The idea is the same.The motor is placed on a metal base where the pilot is seated as well. In USA mostly fly powershutes but in EUROPE is more common to see paramotors. The difference in weight and in the chassis makes the powershute more difficult to land in small fields. On the other hand powerchutes use more stable paragliders and offer bigger safety in the air. Training for both sports needs before to learn free flying with a paraglider.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

do I need a pilot's licence?

 

  do I need a pilot's licence?

Yes you need a paraglider's pilot licence, depending of the rules of your country and a minimum training is required to become proficient in the proper use and operation of the Paramotor.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

how does the chute inflate?

 

   how does the chute inflate?

Simply remove the chute from its tote bag and lay it out behind the craft. As you begin to run, the forward motion, in combination with the wind, if any, and the prop blast is enough to quickly bring the chute up overhead. Next, squeeze the throttle and gently lift off.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

can I launch it myself?

 

  can I launch it myself?

Yes! Most definitely! The Paramotor or powerchute has been specifically designed to be a one person endeavour.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

what is the maximum wind I can fly in?

 

 

  what is the maximum wind I can fly in?

Steady winds of less than 15 km/h for beginners, no more than 25 km/h winds for experienced pilots.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

how do I steer it?

 

  how do I steer it?

Using hand controls, pull left to go left and right to go right. While in the air the paraglider/parachute wing will turn proportionate to the amount of pressure you apply to the steering controls.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

how long can I fly on a tank?

 

  how long can I fly on a tank?

Although actual flight times will vary depending on pilot weight and atmospheric conditions, the average time ranges from 1-2 hours.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

how fast does it fly?

 

  how fast does it fly?

This depends on your paraglider's speed. A good speed is less than 40 km/h and less than 48 km/h with accelerator.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

what happens when the engine stops?

 

  what happens when the engine stops?

Directional steering is controlled through the canopy, therefore not dependent on engine power. The pilot steers the same way with or without power.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 is it safe?

 

  is it safe?

Absolutely!  You're flying a parachute after all! What could be safer? By its very design a powered parachute is virtually impossible to stall, roll, dive or loop. A powered parachute almost flies itself - due to the pendulum effect created by your hanging (like a pendulum) under the canopy. Even if you run out of gas its a snap to land a powered parachute. After all, skydivers don't need an engine to land safely, do they? And you never need to worry about your chute opening because it's impossible to leave the ground unless your chute is already up! 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

is it exciting?

 

  is it exciting?

You bet! Any pilot will tell you that flying "low and slow" is where the real fun (and the best view) can be found. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

is it affordable?

 

  is it affordable?

Yes indeed! You can pick up a used powered parachute for under $4,000 and a new top of the line unit with full instrumentation will only run about $14,000. If you compare that with the cost of buying a snowmobile, jet ski or motorcycle I think you'll agree that flying is now within the price range of just about everyone. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

is it easy to learn?

 

 

  is it easy to learn?

No, we're not kidding! You can solo in a powered parachute after only one afternoon of instruction! Hey, thousands have already done it and so can you! 

Powered parachutes are available in two basic configurations: single and dual seat units. In both configurations you sit in a framework of aircraft grade steel alloy and aluminium tubes - somewhat akin to a three wheeled Go-Kart with a propeller mounted on the back. The parachute is attached to the airframe on short outriggers to provide added stability. 

Absolutely NOTHING is easier to fly. Steering is accomplished by pulling on a line attached to the outside trailing edge of the chute. The lines are attached to foot bars; so to turn left you push on the left foot bar and to turn right you push on the right foot bar. Increasing or decreasing your altitude is as simple as increasing or decreasing the throttle. A peculiarity of the aerodynamics of the chutes used in powered parachuting is that they only fly at one speed - typically around 28 MPH. Therefore, increasing your engine speed does not increase your airspeed, it simply causes you to climb. Decreasing your engine speed causes you to descend. Weird, but true! 

To take off you simply lay the chute out on the ground behind you, start your engine and begin to move forward. The air flowing over the chute from your propeller and your forward motion causes the chute to pop up off the ground and rise above your head. Once the chute is overhead just a little more forward speed will lift you quite quickly (typically 500-700 FPM) up into the wild blue yonder. Take off distances are amazingly short (depending upon conditions), ranging from 50-300 feet. Landing distances are even shorter (and can even be zero!), typically running 50-200 feet. Grass runways are used to keep abrasion on the chute to a minimum, but all you really need is a grass field 500-1000 feet on a side to serve as your aerodrome. 

It is becoming widely recognized that powered parachuting is going to be the next 'BIG THING'.  So what are you waiting for? Don't be left behind! 

Check out these sites to learn more about powered parachuting safety, aerodynamics, FAA regulations, magazines, FAQ's, internet resources, clubs and organizations, manufacturers and much, much more.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


 

 
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